The Maha Festival is known for attracting young people and professionals to Omaha

The Maha Festival is known for attracting young people and professionals to Omaha | Pro Club Bd

The city of Omaha earlier this week recognized the Maha Festival for its efforts in attracting people to the city, particularly young professionals. People from the region and across the country attended the festival, which was held in full for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic. Friends from Amherst College in Massachusetts spend their weekend and money on the subway and enjoy Omaha’s intimate atmosphere. “My friends were like, ‘Oh, we should go to this music festival,'” said Cyrus Wheaton, who is originally from Los Angeles. “I’ve been to Chicago and they’ve been to Minnesota, and it sounded like a fun ride.” “We keep seeing people, then we meet them and we’re like, ‘Oh, hey, what’s up!'” testified Rebecca Schwartz Manhattan, New York. “What struck me is that everyone here seems really excited to meet you,” said Jack St. George of Duluth, Minnesota. “We usually go to Lollapalooza, but this year the cast was so bad,” said Davis Provost of St. Cloud, Minnesota. “All these big-ticket festivals have the worst lineups, and this lineup just wiped everything out of the water.” Maha’s co-executive director says it’s for everyone, but in the fourteen years that Having hosted hundreds of artists, Rachel Grace says it’s gotten more data-centric than people realize. Organizers conduct on-site surveys to align programming. Items popular with people under the age of 34 are prioritized. “There are tools in this industry that you can look at, one is called Chartmetric,” Grace said. “It shows what the demographics are for each band’s audience, so we usually look at it to make sure it’s targeted for the professional demographic.” Grace says most of the attendees are from Omaha. Ten percent come from the rest of the state. About 30 percent are from outside, often between 27 and 35 percent, according to Grace. While digital ads are running in markets like Kansas City and Minneapolis, people from Missouri and Colorado say the festival has brought them here for the past few years and taken them to other parts of the subway Boiler Room,” Kyra Rehman testified Boulder, Colo. “I was here in the summer of 2016; this place looks very different,” said Marc Davis of Kansas City, Missouri. The people from outside described an Aksarb being energized by young people. “Most people seem to be from here, and everyone who meets us is really surprised that we’re here,” said Rebecca Schwartz. “I’m very impressed with how clean it is,” said Wheaton. Though they’ve stopped caring about Omaha any more. “We’re only here for the weekend, we’re at a music festival. I can’t say we want to live here full-time,” Schwartz said. Still drawn to Omaha’s creative vibrancy.

The city of Omaha recognized the Maha Festival earlier this week for its efforts to attract people to the city, particularly young professionals.

People from the region and across the country attended the festival, which was held in full for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic. Friends from Amherst College in Massachusetts spend their weekend and money on the subway and enjoy Omaha’s intimate atmosphere.

“My friends were like, ‘Oh, we should go to this music festival,'” said Cyrus Wheaton, who is originally from Los Angeles. “I was in Chicago and they were in Minnesota, and it sounded like a fun ride down.”

“We keep seeing people, then we meet them and we’re like, ‘Oh, hey, what’s up!'” said Rebecca Schwartz of Manhattan, New York.

“What struck me is that everyone here seems really excited to meet you,” said Jack St. George of Duluth, Minnesota.

“We usually go to Lollapalooza, but this year the lineup was so bad,” said Davis Provost of St. Cloud, Minnesota. “All these big-ticket festivals have the worst lineups, and this lineup just wiped everything out of the water.”

Maha’s co-executive director says there’s something for everyone, but in the fourteen years it’s hosted hundreds of artists, Rachel Grace says it’s become more data-centric than people realize.

The organizers conduct on-site surveys to align the program. Items popular with people under the age of 34 are prioritized.

“In this industry there are tools to look at, one is called Chartmetric,” Grace said. “That shows what the demographics are for each individual band’s audience, so we usually just look at that to make sure it’s targeted for the professional demographic.”

Grace says most of the attendees are from Omaha. Ten percent come from the rest of the country.

About 30 percent are foreigners, often between 27 and 35 percent, Grace says.

While digital ads are running in markets like Kansas City and Minneapolis, people from Missouri and Colorado say the festival has brought them here and taken them to other parts of Metro in years past.

“It was really fun walking through the Old Market and visiting some of my favorite restaurants from my last visit here, especially the Boiler Room,” said Kyra Rehman of Boulder, Colorado.

“I was here in the summer of 2016; this place looks very different,” said Marc Davis of Kansas City, Missouri.

Outsiders described an Aksarb being energized by young people.

“Most people seem to be from here, and everyone who meets us is really surprised that we’re here,” said Rebecca Schwartz.

“I’m very impressed with how clean it is,” Wheaton said.

Although they stopped being more interested in Omaha.

“We’re only here for the weekend, we’re at a music festival. I can’t say we would want to live here full-time,” Schwartz said.

Still drawn to Omaha’s creative vibrancy.

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